Summer is a great time to tell your story, Darlin’ !

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Hey y’all! Summer is almost in full swing, and there’s no better time to share your story with the non-farm public. Chances are, you’ve been planting and spraying, doing a little side-dressing, and maybe you even have a pasture full of spring calves. Your neighbors may have some questions, and you have the answers.

Whether in person or online, there are a number of things that those of us in agriculture take for granted that the non-farm public has no idea about. Example: The Kentucky Soybean Board recently co-sponsored a farm tour with the Kentucky Beef Council, and took a couple of busloads of nutritionists and dietitians to Hill View Farms and Cecil Farms, both near Owensboro. These ladies are highly regarded as experts on food and nutrition, including food safety, yet they were shocked to see Suzanne Cecil White hold up a measuring cup to show just how much (or how little) herbicide is actually sprayed on an acre of crop land. Many of these ladies had no idea that more than 95% of the liquid in the sprayer tank is plain water.

These are intelligent and educated ladies, and they would never knowingly mislead their patients. But how are they to know about agriculture? How are they to KNOW that we aren’t drenching, dousing or drowning our crops in RoundUp once a week? Should they be expected to magically know the levels of chemicals that are applied to our crops? I don’t think so.

I think we have to tell them, and others, just what we’re doing on the farm. And sometimes that’s hard, because U.S. farmers know they’re raising the safest, most affordable food supply in the world. Farmers feed their crops to their own families and livestock. Joe Farmer knows that he and his neighbor down the road have nutrient management plans and that every acre of ground has a record of what was applied, when and why. We know we’re doing the right things for the right reasons, and it’s important that farmers – a naturally modest group – talk about the advances we’ve made in erosion control, nutrient management, animal husbandry and precision application of inputs.

The non-farm public is floored to find that the nozzles on the sprayer shut themselves off if GPS tells them there’s already been a droplet sprayed on an area. They have no idea that, thanks to precision planting technology, you know exactly how many seeds per acre are in a particular field. The fact that you can overlay harvest data on top of planting data and weather records blows their minds.

So this summer, whether you’re at a family reunion cookout or selling sweet corn at the local farmers’ market, be approachable. Tell your story. Open your “barn doors” and let folks know that we have nothing to hide, and that we in agriculture are proud of the efficient, sustainable way we are producing food, feed, fuel and fiber for our families, our country and beyond.

 

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